Russia – Korea – Mexico: Success Stories of the NIRS31 road sensor

Launched in 2008, the NIRS31 was Lufft’s first non-contact road weather sensor that allows easy installation without road closures and costly construction work. It is therefore particularly suitable for the use on bridges where the installation of embedded ground probes entails structural risks. As bridges are usually exposed to stronger winds and the cooling and evaporation of the underlying water it makes sense to monitor them thoroughly.

The NIRS31 was also the base for the development of the mobile sensor MARWIS and the latest stationary sensor with a lower installation height StaRWIS. Reason enough to dedicate this contribution to this sensor – with the best references!

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Great Lakes need great Data Buoys

The Great Lakes region consists of five natural bodies of water in the North of the U.S. Another lake within a group of waters is the West-Okoboji Lake located in Dickinson County, northwest Iowa. Their clear water in combination with the lakes’ depths come along with a lot of measureable activities. These can be observed by means of data buoys. Their further task is to help preserving the water quality. Most of the buoy projects are supported by the government, agencies and universities, who install and maintain them. More about two actual projects here in the blog post…

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Weather sensor of highest Quality – the new WS510-UMB

Some time ago we reported about the Imperial Valley, where a large photovoltaic power plant is operated and maintained. This is done with the help of Lufft WS503-UMB sensors equipped with a Kipp&Zonen pyranometer (global radiation sensor) CMP3 of the Second Class standard. Second Class represents the third highest quality level for pyranometers. Often, however, this standard is not enough for the high demands of the solar industry…

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The history of weather reports

For centuries, people have tried to predict the weather. But for centuries a glance at the sky was all that they could do. Only towards the end of the 19th Century first meteorologists could use instruments to capture weather data with more scientific precision.

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